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January 2020

Monday, 27 January 2020 00:00

Swollen Feet During Pregnancy

It is common knowledge that pregnant women have swollen feet. This typically occurs in the second trimester, and can be a result of hormonal changes, the growing fetus, and lifestyle habits. Research has indicated mild relief may be found when the feet are elevated as frequently as possible, and eating foods that have limited sodium. Additionally, it is beneficial to wear comfortable shoes, and to practice gentle stretching during the day. Some of these stretches can include rotating the ankles, pointing and flexing the feet, and it may help to refrain from crossing your ankles. If you would like additional information about the impact pregnancy may have on the feet, please consult with a podiatrist.

Pregnant women with swollen feet can be treated with a variety of different methods that are readily available. For more information about other cures for swollen feet during pregnancy, consult with Dr. Ira Silverman from New Jersey. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

What Foot Problems Can Arise During Pregnancy?

One problem that can occur is overpronation, which occurs when the arch of the foot flattens and tends to roll inward.  This can cause pain and discomfort in your heels while you’re walking or even just standing up, trying to support your baby.  

Another problem is edema, or swelling in the extremities. This often affects the feet during pregnancy but tends to occur in the later stages. 

How Can I Keep My Feet Healthy During Pregnancy?

  • Wearing orthotics can provide extra support for the feet and help distribute weight evenly
  • Minimize the amount of time spent walking barefoot
  • Wear shoes with good arch support
  • Wear shoes that allow for good circulation to the feet
  • Elevate feet if you experience swelling
  • Massage your feet
  • Get regular, light exercise, such as walking, to promote blood circulation to the feet

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Willingboro, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Foot Care for Pregnant Women
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The feet are the foundation of the body, and because of that, they often face a great deal of pressure and demand throughout the day. In order to keep your feet both strong and flexible, as well as prevent injuries, it’s recommended that you include light stretches for your feet in your daily routine. One example of a stretch you can perform is known as the towel stretch. You begin by sitting on the floor with your legs straight out. You’d then take a towel, wrap it around your toes, and begin to pull the towel towards you, holding for 15-30 seconds. Another exercise you can perform using a towel consists of sitting in a chair with a towel in front of you, and gently picking the towel up using only your toes. When practiced on a weekly basis, these exercises should help to build strength in your feet and lower leg regions. For more advice on light exercises you can practice helping prevent injuries, we recommend you consult with a podiatrist for professional recommendations.

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with Dr. Ira Silverman from New Jersey. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Stretching the muscles in the foot is an important part in any physical activity. Feet that are tight can lead to less flexibility and make you more prone to injury. One of the most common forms of foot pain, plantar fasciitis, can be stretched out to help ease the pain. Stretching can not only ease pain from plantar fasciitis but also prevent it as well. However, it is important to see a podiatrist first if stretching is right for you. Podiatrists can also recommend other ways to stretch your feet. Once you know whether stretching is right for you, here are some excellent stretches you can do.

  • Using a foam roller or any cylindrical object (a water bottle or soda can will do), roll the object under your foot back and forth. You should also exert pressure on the object. Be sure to do this to both feet for a minute. Do this exercise three times each.
  • Similar to the previous one, take a ball, such as a tennis ball, and roll it under your foot while seated and exert pressure on it.
  • Grab a resistance band or towel and take a seat. If you are using a towel, fold it length wise. Next put either one between the ball of your foot and heel and pull with both hands on each side towards you. Hold this for 15 seconds and then switch feet. Do this three times for each foot.
  • Finally hold your big toe while crossing one leg over the other. Pull the toe towards you and hold for 15 seconds. Once again do this three times per foot.

It is best to go easy when first stretching your foot and work your way up. If your foot starts hurting, stop exercising and ice and rest the foot. It is advised to then see a podiatrist for help.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Willingboro, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about How to Stretch Your Feet
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Morton’s neuroma is a foot condition that involves the feet developing the sensation of numbness, or a lack of feeling. Those who frequently wear high heels run the risk of pushing the toe bones against the nerve, increasing their chances of developing Morton’s neuroma. Because high heels are often tightly fitted, the circulation of blood flow that the feet require may be lessened due to the popular footwear. Those with Morton’s neuroma often report having foot pain, and feel as if there is a pebble in their shoe while walking, along with a stinging sensation. It is advised to vary the amount of times you wear high heels throughout the week to lessen your chances of developing this condition. For a proper diagnosis and advised treatment plan, we recommend that you consult with a podiatrist for professional care.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Ira Silverman of New Jersey. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Willingboro, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Morton's Neuroma
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Monday, 06 January 2020 00:00

Types of Heel Pain

Heel pain is experienced by many patients as a gradual occurrence. It may develop as a result of repetitive stress the heel endures, which can come from frequently running or standing for the majority of the day. A common type of heel pain is referred to as plantar fasciitis, and this affects the portion of tissue that is located on the bottom of the foot. When children have heel pain, it may be indicative of Sever’s disease, which targets the heel plate of growing teenagers. The condition that is known as Achilles tendinosis can happen from sudden movements, and can affect the heel and the bottom of the calf muscles. If you have any type of heel pain, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can properly diagnose and treat your condition.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Dr. Ira Silverman of New Jersey. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Willingboro, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Heel Pain
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Friday, 03 January 2020 00:00

Are Bunions Affecting Your Everyday Life?

Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

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